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Price of new containers at a 10-year low, putting pressure on leasing companies

first_img The global container fleet grew by 6.2% last year to reach 36.6 million teu, and for the first time 40 ft high-cubes accounted for the majority of the equipment in service, in terms of teu.Moreover, according to the latest edition of Drewry’s Container Census, the price of new boxes is at a 10-year low – the shipping consultancy’s price index for June falling below $1,750 per ceu (container equivalent unit), compared with an average of $2,000 over the past two years.“Much of the recent reduction resulted from a fall in material and production costs rather than decline in demand or oversupply,” said report author and lead analyst for container equipment Andrew Foxcroft.He added: “Drewry is forecasting that the price index will, at best, hold at $1,800 per ceu for much of 2015-2016 – although it may even go lower.”Drewry forecasts growth at an annualised rate of “close to 5% through 2015 to 2018”, which Mr Foxcroft said was in line with the modest outlook for trade growth.“Box fleet expansion will remain relatively weak because a growing share of the anticipated demand will be replacement purchases, while the outlook for global container shipping traffic is generally subdued,” he explained.With ocean carriers putting any spare capital into ultra-large container vessels, container leasing companies maintained strong market growth last year of 9% in their operating fleet, compared with 4% growth for the carrier-owned fleet and, according to Mr Foxcroft, leasing companies remain well placed to raise finance for new purchases.Meanwhile, the drop in new container prices and the appreciation of the US dollar has, unsurprisingly, exerted considerable pressure on the used container market. This was confirmed by major lessor TAL, which reported that resale prices were down by around 25% in the first quarter, compared with the same three months of 2014.Elsewhere, the world’s biggest container leasing company Textainer, which operates a fleet of 2.2 million – equivalent to 3.2m teu – also reported challenging market conditions in its first-quarter result.It said: “Demand for containers is slower than expected and we face strong competition for the lease-out opportunities that do arise. As a result, we continue to see downward pressure on container rental rates.”President and chief executive Philip Brewer added: “We are cautious about 2015. While we believe our utilisation will stay high, we also expect competition to remain strong with continued pressure on rental rates due to the high level of liquidity available to container lessors coupled with low new container prices, ample factory capacity and low interest rates.“Given the outlook for steel prices and muted demand, new container prices will not increase in the near term and are likely to decrease further.”Mr Brewer also noted that the average age of containers in service was increasing, suggesting that many would need to be replaced over the next few years. By Mike Wackett 06/07/2015last_img read more

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Urgent action required as mouse plague spreads

first_imgUrgent action required as mouse plague spreads NSW Farmers estimates the mouse plague will chew more than a billion dollars off the farmgate value of the state’s winter crop as the impact of this mouse invasion extends across NSW.The government funded Mouse Alert website indicates reported sightings have doubled since 31 March 2021, with a growing number of mice being sighted in and around Sydney.NSW Farmers Vice President Xavier Martin said the window to act and control this plague is now.“Farmers are abandoning some paddocks and cannot hold off winter crop sowing a moment longer and researchers warn that without a concerted baiting effort in the next few weeks this could easily turn into a two year plague event,” Mr Martin said.“After more than 8 months of battling growing mouse numbers farmers are still waiting for State Government assistance to hit the ground and offer some practical support to our farming community.”“The State Government’s assistance package is impractical, dysfunctional and weeks away, which is not helping farmers who need support right now to drive mouse numbers down and break this horrible unrelenting cycle.”“NSW Farmers has consistently said the simplest, safest and most timely way for the State Government to assist farmers would be through providing rebates of up to $25,000 per farm business to cover 50% of the cost of zinc phosphide bait.Mr Martin said NSW Farmers initially welcomed the state government’s $50 million assistance package, however it has become apparent that elements of the Plan including the provision of “free baits for farmers” are still dependent on APVMA approval which may be weeks away.“‘This mouse plague will be a significant financial hit to the NSW economy, as it is not just about the grain crop, and food production, but also all the regional businesses, traders and employees that rely on the farming sector. The NSW grains industry alone employs more than 10,000 people in regional areas.”“Each day we delay in taking effective action to control these mice will increase economic losses and the likelihood we will still be battling mice come Christmas time.” /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Agriculture, business, community, Economy, Employees, Farming, food, Government, Impact, industry, mouse, New South Wales, NSW, NSW Farmers, President, production, Sydney, websitelast_img read more

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CU graduating senior excels after emigrating from Romania as a political refugee

first_img Published: May 1, 2012 Boroka Bo, a 31-year-old senior sociology major, is graduating May 11 from the University of Colorado Boulder, 17 years after emigrating from the Transylvania region of Romania to the United States as a political refugee.This spring, Bo received a prestigious Soros Fellowship, a program that awards 30 fellowships annually to naturalized citizens, green card holders or children of naturalized citizens. It provides up to $90,000 in support to students who plan to use their graduate education to contribute back to their communities.“I feel like my goals for life are completely in line with what the Soros Fellowship strives to accomplish, and I feel extremely humbled to be one of their fellows,” she said. “Every year they pick an incredibly impressive and accomplished group of students, and I am very excited to be a part of this year’s cohort of fellows.”After graduation, Bo will begin graduate school this fall at the University of California, San Francisco, focusing on medical sociology, and said she looks forward to learning all she can to become a meaningful contributor to the field.“As soon as I started at CU, I started looking around for ways to not only engage with but also contribute to the CU community,” she said. “I always feel like it is somehow my job to give back to the school and country that provides me with so much.”While at CU, Bo served on several committees and boards including the CU Health and Wellness Committee, the Chancellor’s Advisory Committee on Minority Affairs and the Wardenburg Student Governing Board.As Hungarians, Bo and her family were discriminated against in Romania and filed for and were given political refugee status in the United States. When she came to the U.S. at the age of 14, she knew little English and to learn she immersed herself in books by spending long hours at the library, acquiring her English comprehension through self-taught methods until she began an English as a Second Language program in high school. She also had to support herself through her high school years by working full time.“I think this allowed me to not only experience and learn from many different jobs, from factories to security work to management, but I also learned how to budget my time effectively so that I can succeed in both school and work,” Bo said.When she entered college, she decided sociology would be a fitting challenge as it forced her to think outside of the box of what she called ‘convention imposed by history.’ The importance of contributing to the lives of others in a tangible manner was one of her biggest motivators for going into medical sociology, which is a field where researchers look at the influence of ethnicity, gender, age or socioeconomic status on the access to and quality of health care.“Sociology does this especially well as you have to remain objective when thinking about your own society, human behavior, exploring questions that are truly important,” she said. “I like medical sociology as I think it allows me to contribute to the lives of the people I work with in a positive manner, instead of being locked into an academic and purely theoretical realm only.”Bo also was involved in the founding of the Transylvania Community Foundation in 2008. The foundation’s initial goal was to support the minority groups of Transylvania through a range of initiatives centered on employment, education, health and intercultural dialogue. The foundation has now partnered with Opportunity Nation and expanded its mission statement to include promoting social mobility and economic opportunity in the U.S. by providing language and technological training to low-income American students via opportunities to travel and volunteer in Europe.“Our ultimate goal in Transylvania is to safeguard the fundamental human rights of communities traditionally marginalized and discriminated against,” Bo said. “We seek to foster a vibrant climate embracing diversity and cultural differences while simultaneously increasing access to reliable, highly skilled sources of employment.”With her remaining days at CU numbered, Bo has plenty of fond memories.“My favorite part of attending CU has been the perfect balance of academic challenge and fun,” she said. “Every day, I feel so blessed to study and work in such a majestic place. I love the proximity to the mountains, nature, sports and fun on the Pearl Street Mall. I think my favorite part is that even though we have a large student body, one can always find their home in the campus community. For me, the campus itself feels safe, welcoming and open, ultimately inspiring innovation and action.”Contact: Boroka Bo, [email protected] Maria DiManna, CU media relations, [email protected] Greg Swenson, CU media relations, 303-492-3113 Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail “As soon as I started at CU, I started looking around for ways to not only engage with but also contribute to the CU community,” said Boroka Bo, a 31-year-old senior sociology major. “I always feel like it is somehow my job to give back to the school and country that provides me with so much.”center_img Boroka Bo Categories:AcademicsGetting InvolvedCampus Communitylast_img read more

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US Cellular CTO offers glimpse of 5G plan

first_imgHome US Cellular CTO offers glimpse of 5G plan Asia Tags Related Nokia scores Philippines 5G deal with Dito Diana Goovaerts Mobile Mix: Buzzing for Barcelona Previous ArticleApple to expand Siri integration with outside appsNext ArticleGoogle gives Maps, Assistant privacy boost center_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 02 OCT 2019 US Cellular set its sights on launching 5G in the first quarter of 2020, announcing Iowa and Wisconsin will be the first markets to receive coverage in a five-year rollout across its footprint.Like T-Mobile US, US Cellular’s deployment will utilise 600MHz spectrum it won at auction in 2017. But unlike larger rivals, CTO Michael Irizarry told Mobile World Live the operator plans to use a dedicated 10×10 MHz channel for its low-band deployment rather than sharing the spectrum between LTE and 5G.He added the operator is working with the likes of Samsung, Apple and LG to bring handsets compatible with its spectrum bands and technology to market in 2020.Its decision to use low-band spectrum means speeds on US Cellular’s network will be much slower than the gigabit speeds registered on mmWave. Still, Irizarry said the upgrade is expected to deliver a “meaningful improvement,” doubling current average LTE speeds of between 8Mb/s and 12 Mb/s.But a bump from mmWave isn’t off the table. US Cellular recently spent $256 million to acquire 24GHz and 28GHz licences covering 98 per cent of its footprint. While no 24GHz kit is available yet, Irizarry noted 5G upgrades to baseband equipment for the low-band deployments will also support mmWave and the operator is eyeing potential deployments in 2021.He added US Cellular has a few tricks up its sleeve to boost mmWave’s infamously short coverage range when the time comes: “If you’re willing to trade off absolute peak speed for breadth of coverage and you mount millimetre wave radios higher up on the tower, you can significantly increase the coverage you get from that spectrum.”Though it plans to use its AWS and PCS spectrum to enhance users’ LTE experience, Irizarry reiterated the operator views mid-band spectrum as a “critical” piece of the 5G puzzle and is closely watching efforts to make spectrum between 3.7GHz and 4.2GHz available for wireless use.He also noted 5G roaming is a top priority for the regional operator, adding it has started discussions with partners about their plans. However, he pointed out roaming arrangements typically follow 12 to 24 months after a new technology is launched, as operators have to work through differences in their implementations. Subscribe to our daily newsletter Back Author Diana is Mobile World Live’s US Editor, reporting on infrastructure and spectrum rollouts, regulatory issues, and other carrier news from the US market. Diana came to GSMA from her former role as Editor of Wireless Week and CED Magazine, digital-only… Read more Telkomsel turns on 5G in major cities 5G600MHzUS Cellularlast_img read more

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Epic vs Steam: Exclusives raise the stakes | Opinion

first_img 3Sign inorRegisterto rate and replyBob Johnson Studying graphics design, Northern Arizona University2 years ago Yep don’t have a problem with it since Epic is trying to challenge Steam. And I think they could use some competition.Plus we already have to run Origin if we want to play an EA game. And run Battle.net for Blizzard and ACtivision games now I assume. 0Sign inorRegisterto rate and replySign in to contributeEmail addressPasswordSign in Need an account? Register now. Edited 1 times. Last edit by TuxedoCruise on 1st February 2019 8:26pm 1Sign inorRegisterto rate and replyShow all comments (6)Bob Johnson Studying graphics design, Northern Arizona University2 years ago @TuxedoCruise: The whole reason is to get the Epic store off the ground. They need an Elephant in the room to combat the 800 lb gorilla. 1Sign inorRegisterto rate and replyTuxedoCruise Journalist & Developer, Self-Emplyed2 years ago I wish more developers/publishers going exclusively to the Epic Games store would address the elephant in the room: being paid millions for their 1-year exclusivity deal.Tim Sweeney has already confirmed that Epic Games pays for third party games to become exclusive to the Epic Games store: https://www.pcgamer.com/epics-tim-sweeney-reveals-how-the-company-lands-exclusives-for-the-epic-store/Some third party developers have also confirmed that they received upfront payment for their 1-year exclusivity: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7V4UPiBOshY&t=90If a better revenue split, no user reviews, a curated store, and connecting with streamers and influencers are enough reasons to leave Steam and go exclusively to the Epic Games store, then why are all of the third party exclusives on the Epic Games store part of a contract that provides a large payout?Are there any third party developers who are exclusive on the Epic Games store without having an exclusivity contract and upfront payment? 2 years ago When valve stole half-life / Counterstrike in 2004. No one had a choice. The reality is the internet has enabled game companies to steal peoples software and take over their machines remotely. There is no market in games because there’s no accountability. How would anyone have prevented valve from forcing drm into half-life in 2004? You’d have to be two blocks away from valve headquarters to be able to effect valves behavior at all. AKA you’d need physical proximity to these companies in an internet enabled age to have anything like a market with accountability or portal technology.The reality is it has always been the game industries wish to get rid of software ownership and control out of the end users hands. The public has no choice because the wires we’ve laid all over the planet undermine any ability to hold these companies accountable. Welcome to lawless capitalism. Where companies can just steal, defraud and fleece the masses from the center of the continent and reach the entire world wherever fibre optic cable can reach. Those cables act like little arms allowing companies to pilfer from gamers without gamers being able to fight back. 0Sign inorRegisterto rate and replyAlexander Sprague Freelance Writer/ Campaign Manager Epic vs Steam: Exclusives raise the stakes | OpinionEpic is Steam’s first real competitor in years – with console-war style exclusive tactics being a controversial, but fair, escalation of the struggleRob FaheyContributing EditorFriday 1st February 2019Share this article Recommend Tweet ShareWhen Epic Games announced that it was going to start up its own digital distribution platform, there was a definite sense that it was throwing down the gauntlet in front of Valve. Steam thoroughly dominates PC game distribution. Epic promised a more equitable revenue share system and gave every impression of having listened to developers’ complaints about Steam’s ill-conceived and poorly handled community features, pledging to create a store that wouldn’t become a vector for abuse or attacks on creators’ livelihoods. Epic’s challenge was a broadside assault of the kind that Steam hasn’t experienced in a long time; the big threat to Steam in recent years has been that big publishers will create their own bespoke stores in which to sell their games, not that a rival would emerge targeting the whole spectrum of developers and games featured on Steam.Epic’s entry into the market was largely welcomed across the board at first — competition is good, after all, and Steam has lacked a serious competitor for a long time. More recently, however, there’s been a bit of a backlash as the extent to which Epic intends to compete, and some of the tactics it intends to use have become more clear. “Without exclusives, challenging an established and dominant market player like Steam is nigh-on impossible” The most recent twist came when the latest instalment in the Metro franchise, Metro Exodus, was signed up for a timed exclusive on Epic’s store. Although pre-orders that were made on Steam prior to the exclusivity deal being announced will still be honoured (you just won’t be able to buy the game there if you hadn’t pre-ordered already), this seems to have ruffled a lot of feathers — some no doubt thanks to choice PR work on Valve’s part, but some simply out of a genuine sense that this kind of exclusivity deal is anti-consumer.In a lot of circumstances, I would agree. Exclusivity deals aren’t something we’ve really seen very often on PC. The debate around them tends to be more focused on console games, where platform holders have often paid third-party publishers to keep their games exclusive to one console or another. In recent years this practice has declined somewhat, with exclusivity (timed or otherwise) for DLC or specific pieces of in-game content being more common than outright exclusivity for the games themselves. That’s partially down to the emergence of a consensus that using a platform holder’s wallet to gain this kind of competitive advantage really was anti-consumer behaviour; the last really high-profile example was Microsoft’s flashing the cash to secure a one-year exclusive on Square Enix’ Rise of the Tomb Raider, a move that was met by a monumentally negative response that did precious little to raise the fortunes of the Xbox One and may actually have damaged the fortunes of the recently revived Tomb Raider franchise. On console, the equation is pretty simple; paying for a third-party exclusive effectively means telling consumers that a game which would in any other scenario be available to them is now going to be locked up behind a $300 (or more) hardware purchase. There are better, and far more fair, ways to compete.Metro Exodus’ timed exclusivity has been decried as ‘anti-consumer’ by some, but this is very different to a console exclusive where content is locked behind expensive hardwareImporting that logic to the competition between Valve and Epic doesn’t really work, however, because both of those stores run on exactly the same hardware; there is no actual cost to consumers for installing Epic’s store, which will run perfectly happily on a PC alongside Steam. In fact, the only reason that Steam’s stranglehold on PC game distribution isn’t outright monopolistic is the fact that anyone really can come along and create a competing platform — a point which Steam’s cheerleaders have made frequently and forcefully over the years, usually at moments when the company’s treatment of game creators was facing a somewhat unflattering spotlight. “If people don’t like Steam, they can make their own store!” is a facile argument, but it’s also entirely true.”Seeing a company being reviled for daring to challenge Valve’s dominance feels very much like a symptom of a dysfunctional market that desperately needs such a shake-up” Well, Epic has made its own store, and it’s now setting about competing using the resources available — which includes its sizeable wallet. This is the reality of what competition in this market actually looks like; any serious competitor to Steam was going to need to have financial clout and a willingness to use it, because the sheer inertia behind the Steam platform is enormous. Epic can create sweetheart deals for developers until the cows come home, but without an actual, tangible reason for people to install the store on their PCs — say, for example, a game they can’t access anywhere else — a vast population of consumers are just going to buy games in Steam anyway. I often think that the highly vocal nature of small gamer communities on Reddit and its ilk leads us to vastly underestimate what a large number of PC gamers don’t actively participate in a community or follow any form of industry news. They keep loose track of the games and franchises they enjoy, but the very existence of a game store that isn’t Steam has likely passed them by. That’s the magnitude of the challenge Epic faces, and it’s also bad for developers, because all Epic’s efforts to get them a better deal in terms of revenue share doesn’t mean squat if consumers golf-clap the announcement (or just don’t hear it) and then promptly buy the games from Steam anyway.Indeed, that points at the more concrete reality here. Not only is securing timed exclusivity a legitimate competitive move on Epic’s part, given the negligible barriers to entry for consumers, it’s also not really an optional move for the fledgling store. Without exclusives, challenging an established and dominant market player like Steam is nigh-on impossible; moreover, the very nature of the deals Epic is doing with developers likely wouldn’t make any commercial sense without exclusivity, for the reasons outlined above. Related JobsSenior Game Designer – UE4 – AAA United Kingdom Amiqus GamesProgrammer – REMOTE – work with industry veterans! North West Amiqus GamesJunior Video Editor – GLOBAL publisher United Kingdom Amiqus GamesDiscover more jobs in games Epic is trying to draw developers to its platform with better revenue shares, but if those developers’ games are also available on Steam, simple consumer inertia means that there won’t actually be very much revenue to share. For the publisher, the equation is simple; if Epic’s revenue share is better, they very much want consumers to buy the game on Epic’s store and not on Steam, perhaps even to the extent of being willing to sacrifice some Steam sales in the belief that the majority of those interested in the game will install the Epic store for it.If anything, the fact that there’s been such a vocal backlash against this situation hints at exactly why Epic’s aggressive move into the market is so important. Steam’s stranglehold isn’t just commercial; in the eyes of many consumers, the platform — for all its failures and all the many complaints levied against it by game creators — is simply the default, proper channel for PC game distribution, so any aggressive move by a competitor to go after its market share is almost automatically viewed as consumer-hostile. Such views are in the minority, no doubt; but seeing a company being reviled for daring to challenge Valve’s dominance, never mind a publisher being attacked for daring to choose a different distribution method for their game, feels very much like a symptom of a dysfunctional market that desperately needs such a shake-up.Celebrating employer excellence in the video games industry8th July 2021Submit your company Sign up for The Daily Update and get the best of GamesIndustry.biz in your inbox. Enter your email addressMore storiesEA leans on Apex Legends and live services in fourth quarterQ4 and full year revenues close to flat and profits take a tumble, but publisher’s bookings still up double-digitsBy Brendan Sinclair 3 hours agoEA Play Live set for July 22Formerly E3-adjacent event moves to take place a month and half after the ESA’s showBy Jeffrey Rousseau 4 hours agoLatest comments (6)Martin Echenique Manager, Online Engineering – Sony WWS Online Technology Group, Sony Computer Entertainment Europe2 years ago It has to be said; in the early days of Steam, Valve’s way to get it into more consumer desktops was to gate Counterstrike 1.6 (and later Half-Life 2) behind it, being effectively “platform exclusives”. And consumers were equally unhappy about it back then at first, and promptly stopped caring. 0Sign inorRegisterto rate and replyBob Villa Artist 2 years ago @TuxedoCruise:I don’t think that developers would be able to make the same income without those incentives. I am interested to see what numbers we can compare of units sold Vs profit margin from Steam to Epic. We already know Epic sees Steams reach is worth millions per game apparently.That said personally I will not be going to Epic’s storefront because of what I perceive to be immoral use of labor and security risks.last_img read more

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Portuguese outrage as freedom of the press is attacked

first_imgThe fierce discussion that the law provoked is a sign of the political establishment’s unease on a touchy subject in a society vulnerable to temptations from political forces to control journalists. All this in a society whose citizens read fewer and fewer newspapers while journalists face increasingly precarious working conditions and are paying the price of market integration in the media sector.The most ferocious detractors of the new TV law, private operators TVI and SIC, fear that the government will use it as a tool to consolidate the position of the state television by making conditions tougher for renewing emission rights. The law is also supposed to regulate the arrival of digital television in Portugal and new regional channels.A law regulating journalists’ activity, which was approved recently, also illustrates the troubled relations between the press and the state’s institutions. The law was described by the country’s journalists’ union as the biggest attack on press freedom since the days of the Salazar dictatorship. And last year the country found out with dismay about a police raid in the offices of daily tabloid newspaper 24 Horas, which published a list of high-ranking politicians, civil servants and judges whose phone calls had been recorded by judicial order in the context of a sex scandal. The public outrage was bigger when it became clear that the state prosecutor was keener on punishing journalists, whose computers were confiscated, than on finding out how judges could order the recording of phone calls by Portugal’s president himself. Just a few months ago, Público, a daily newspaper, was condemned by the Supreme Court for having published facts that, while being true, had damaged the reputation of a football club. Political scientists and sociologists are now busy trying to answer whether such facts are a serious threat to the democratic nature of a modern European country. Alexandra Lobão is a freelance journalist based in Brussels. The publication of the controversial interview coincided with the announcement that another Socialist heavyweight, José Lemos, would also be on the Media Capital board. The national media watchdog Entidade Reguladora para a Comunicacão Social (ERC) is now analysing the extent to which ideology could be jeopardising TVI’s independence. Are we facing a conflict between freedom of the press and controlled information? Is the appointment compatible with the conditions which the channel had to meet to receive its licence? The answers to these questions are crucial for the ERC itself, which has been fighting to impose its legitimacy since it was created less than two years ago. The present imbroglio could not have come at a worse moment for the government. Prime Minister José Sócrates’s honeymoon period with the public seems to be over. He is currently under fire over his civil engineer diploma, which was issued by a university recently closed by a ministerial decision for lack of minimum quality standards. The episode has made him question the motivations of newspapers which made the decision public. And this occurs after the approval of a new television law, backed only by the ruling Socialist Party. center_img Luís Marques Mendes, leader of the main centre-right opposition party PSD reacted swiftly to the decision taken by Spanish group Prisa, majority shareholder of Media Capital, to appoint the former finance minister to the top job. Marques Mendes accused the ruling Socialist Party of “wanting to take control of everything”. Bearing in mind the alleged links between Prisa and the Spanish Socialist Party, media experts and opinion-makers also expressed reservations. Criticism of the decision intensified when Pina Moura acknowledged, in an interview last weekend with weekly newspaper Expresso, that his appointment was politically motivated. last_img read more

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Donald Trump won’t rule out using nukes in Europe

first_imgThe option of using nuclear weapons, either in the Middle East or Europe, should never be taken off the table, Donald Trump said Wednesday.During a town hall meeting in Wisconsin, MSNBC’s Chris Matthews asked Trump, on a quest to become the Republican presidential candidate, if he could rule out the use of nuclear weapons in Europe.“I’m not going to take it off the table,” Trump said. When Matthews asked again whether Trump might use nuclear weapons in Europe, the real estate mogul responded: “No. I don’t think so, but … I am not taking cards off the table.” Trump has previously sent mixed signals on the issue.He told The New York Times over the weekend that nuclear proliferation is the world’s “biggest problem,” but later told CNN that “maybe it’s going to have to be time to change” U.S. policy that prevents Japan and South Korea from having nuclear weapons.“We’re better off if Japan protects itself against this maniac in North Korea, we’re better off, frankly, if South Korea is going to start to protect itself,” Trump told CNN.When Matthews suggested Wednesday that no one wants to hear a potential U.S. president talking about using nuclear weapons, Trump responded: “Then why are we making them?”last_img read more

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