Tag: 上海品茶网

With the help of ketamine, researchers rewrite memories in a bid to curb harmful drinking

first_img About the Author Reprints Scientists still don’t know what gives ketamine its antidepressant effect. Stressed mice might offer a clue [email protected] But the study comes with several notable caveats. It was a small study and was only single-blinded. The participants hadn’t been clinically diagnosed with alcohol use disorder and their behavior was self-reported. They were recruited through online ads, which outside experts said introduces the possibility that the participants had already considered reducing the amount they drank and would have done so without any kind of intervention.There’s also a question of why drinking fell across all three groups — and what that might signal about how well the memory retrieval and ketamine combination approach works in the long run, said Mary Torregrossa, a University of Pittsburgh neuroscientist who has studied drug-associated memories.“This is a good first study that lends support to doing more trials and similar trials in different populations,” said Torregrossa, who wasn’t involved in the research. Torregrossa said the approach could also be studied for other substance use disorders.There are still big questions about the best way to dig up memories and disrupt them. What works well to retrieve a memory for one person — like showing a picture of people laughing in a bar — might not be the best approach to trigger memories for another. Das, the study’s co-author, said he hoped one day retrieval methods could be somewhat personalized to the patient.And because mucking up memories is a “silent process,” there isn’t a biomarker for scientists to measure how well they’ve done. For now, with experiments such as the new study, they have to rely on behavioral cues, like how much less a person is drinking after reconsolidation.It’s also still not clear how many memories need to be disrupted for such an approach to work.“Real memories have been formed over years and hundreds of different contexts,” said Das.People with alcohol use disorder would, presumably, have a string of memories associated with drinking. Does manipulating one retrieved memory have a sweeping effect?“We are still getting a handle on how far it spreads if you did this kind of memory manipulation,” said Milton, the University of Cambridge researcher. Related: When you make a memory, it’s stored within a few hours. But our brains are constantly retrieving those stored memories — they’re what tells us how to open a Google Doc or which way to turn to get to the grocery store.Your brain uses those memories to make predictions. On your route to the grocery store, your brain knows to turn right at a certain intersection. The road will be open, you’ll drive 2 miles, and arrive at the store. If everything goes according to plan and there’s no new information for your brain to absorb, the memory gets reshelved for the next time it’s needed.But what if something unexpected happens — like a road closed for construction?“That means the memories you were using probably weren’t correct and need updating,” said Milton. Experts think that unexpected surprise — and the subsequent need to update — makes a memory temporarily unstable.The researchers wanted to swoop in during that period of instability and manipulate the memories associated with alcohol.But to do that, they first needed to bring the relevant memories to the forefront of participants’ minds. They did so with a process called memory retrieval — essentially, cueing the brain to pull a memory back up. It’s similar to the process used in existing mental health treatments, like cognitive behavioral therapy or exposure therapy.In the new study, researchers tested their approach on a group of 90 participants who hadn’t formally been diagnosed with alcohol use disorder, but drank at high and harmful levels. HealthWith the help of ketamine, researchers rewrite memories in a bid to curb harmful drinking ‘Show me the data!’: We asked experts to pick apart a clinic’s claims about ketamine Related: News Editor On the first day, researchers handed the participants a glass of beer and told them they could drink it after looking at a series of images. Those images — pictures of beer — and the beer itself were designed to be memory retrieval cues. After rating the images and their own desire to drink the beer, the participants were allowed to drink it.The researchers ran through the whole rigamarole gain two days later. But the second time around, participants weren’t allowed to drink the beer — a surprise twist designed to make their alcohol-associated memories malleable.Then, the researchers quickly gave the participants either an infusion of saline or an infusion of ketamine. Another group of patients received a dose of ketamine without undergoing memory retrieval. The drug is known to act on the brain’s NMDA receptor. The receptor plays a key part in the process of restabilizing memories — also known as “reconsolidation” — after they’ve been updated.“We’re leveraging that period when the memory is unstable and trying to get in there with a drug like ketamine to prevent it from restabilizing,” said Ravi Das, a psychopharmacology researcher at University College London and a co-author of the new study.The preliminary results suggest it worked. The participants didn’t stop drinking completely, and objectively drank more than recommended. But about a week after the second part of the experiment, people in the ketamine and memory retrieval group had less of an urge to drink, drank less, and drank less often than their peers in other groups. Nine months out, those effects held up. All three groups had decreased their drinking by that time, but the decrease from initial drinking levels was most significant among people in the ketamine and memory retrieval group.“It’s a really exciting development. This is the first time it’s been shown in a clinical population that this can be effective,” said Milton.center_img Justin Sullivan/Getty Images By Megan Thielking Nov. 26, 2019 Reprints “We know these cues cause relapse. Could you disrupt the memory associated between the cues and the [alcohol], and stop the relapse from happening?” said Amy Milton, a University of Cambridge researcher who has studied memory retrieval in addiction.“It’s a really, really simple question. Practically, it’s a bit tricky to do,” added Milton, who wasn’t involved in the research.advertisement Our memories are immensely powerful. For a person with alcohol use disorder, a memory triggered by a simple cue — like walking by a favorite bar or spotting a beer billboard — can drive a desire for a drink.But they’re also surprisingly pliable. And scientists are trying to curb harmful drinking by dredging up memories and rewriting them — with the help of a dose of ketamine, a longtime anesthetic which is also used recreationally and to treat certain mental health conditions.The idea hinges on the rewriting of the memories associated with drinking. Those memories are often associated with environmental cues, like certain friends a person with alcohol use disorder always drank with. By manipulating those memories in a moment when they’re malleable, researchers hope to break the tie between memories and environmental cues — and in turn, prevent relapse. In a small, preliminary new study published Tuesday in Nature Communications, the approach was associated with less alcohol consumption and less of an urge to drink among people who drank heavily and often.advertisement @meggophone Related: Megan Thielking J&J’s new esketamine drug for depression may solve an unmet need, but may not be cost-effective Tags mental healthresearchsubstance abuselast_img read more

Read More

Survey: OTT VoIP users to near 1B in 2013

first_imgHome Survey: OTT VoIP users to near 1B in 2013 Related Skype facing telecoms sector regulation AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 10 JUL 2013 Author Tags Richard is the editor of Mobile World Live’s money channel and a contributor to the daily news service. He is an experienced technology and business journalist who previously worked as a freelancer for many publications over the last decade including… Read more Skype registers telecoms service after losing EU casecenter_img Previous ArticleEtisalat’s Maroc Telecom deal given local partner conditionNext ArticleBlackBerry chief reiterates device strategy Apps A new survey by Infonetics Research highlights how many mobile subscribers are adopting VoIP applications, with nearly one billion users expected this year. But ARPU levels remain low, it says.Adoption of mobile VoIP, in which Skype remains the dominant force, continues to pick up pace. User numbers were over 640 million in 2012, a 550 per cent increase over the previous year.Yet the revenues for the major players are not substantial. Infonetics has calculated that mobile VoIP ARPU is only $7 annually (2012 figure), which is why Over-The-Top (OTT) players are looking for alternative sources of revenue, such as advertising, add-on features, third-party apps and wholesale deals with mobile operators.Skype is still the leading force with a 40 per cent share of all active users of OTT mobile VoIP services in 2012, said the survey.Other players include Fring, KakaoTalk, Line, Nimbuzz, WeChat and Viber.Separately, the survey looks at the market for voice over LTE (VoLTE) and has upped its predictions, given the recent success of SK Telecom’s deployment.The firm now expects 12 commercial VoLTE networks and eight million subscribers by the end of 2013. The focus will be Asia Pacific, which will account for about three quarters of the market. The key has been Korea where SK Telecom has attracted 3.6 million VoLTE subscribers (April 2013 figure). Richard Handford Skype to kill off old app InfoneticsSkypeViberlast_img read more

Read More

GMP: All 12,000 impacted by storm are back on

first_imgGreen Mountain Power Corp,Vermont Business Magazine Wednesday’s strong wind storm blew down trees and branches, cutting power to thousands of Green Mountain Power customers. By Thursday morning, GMP had restored power to all 12,000 customers impacted by the storm. Meanwhile, Vermont Electric Cooperative (VEC) field and control room staff were able to respond promptly to restore power to over 2,500 members who lost power due to strong winds that downed trees and power lines.“Some of the towns hardest hit included Montgomery, Huntington, Starksboro, Hinesburg, Bakersfield, Underhill, and Cambridge,” said Jeff Wright, VEC Chief Operating Officer. “Our crews were prepared for a significant outage and tackled the challenges of this weather event quickly and safely. As we roll into Thursday we will be able to access and respond to the few remaining outages.  We appreciate our member’s patience as we finish the restoration work.”Members can go to VEC’s outage page for the most up to date information about outages and restoration times www.vermontelectric.coop/outag(link is external)“Early preparation before the storm hit helped assure that crews were in place across the state and could restore power quickly to all customers,” said Dorothy Schnure, GMP spokesperson. Winds were strongest on the western part of the state, and the areas that sustained the most damage included Rutland, Royalton, St. Albans, Sunderland, Middlebury, Stamford and nearby towns. Green Mountain Power continues to watch the weather closely, as a cold front this afternoon could bring new outages. Crews are resting now so that they will be ready for any new outages. “After a relatively quiet summer, we are headed into a time of year when storms are more frequent,” Schnure said. “Safety is our number one priority during storms. We urge Vermonters to be ready, and always stay clear of and report downed power lines to us” Green Mountain Power will provide updates on Facebook, Twitter and to the media. Customers may report outages and get updates through GMP’s text service, award-winning app, by calling 1-888-835-4672, or visiting GMP’s Outage Center page at www.greenmountainpower.com(link is external).To sign up for the text service, simply text REG to 46788 or GMPVT, or sign up online at greenmountainpower.com/textalerts(link is external). Customers can sign up for GMP’s award-winning app at the Apple App Store or Google Play Store and search for GMP.last_img read more

Read More

An experience to share from Maggie Heggerston

first_imgAn experience to share from Maggie HeggerstonThe Pequot Lakes native is one of just two seniors on the golf team this year. Nick JungheimOctober 18, 2018Jump to CommentsShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare via EmailPrintOver the past four years, the faces on Minnesota’s women’s golf team have changed significantly. Players graduate or transfer and new recruits take their place. Experienced leaders play an important role in the preparation and growth of younger teammates. For the Gophers, that leader is Maggie Heggerston.On a roster comprising primarily underclassmen, Heggerston knows her responsibility is to lend perspective and insight based on her time playing at the NCAA level. Now in her senior season, she has become someone her teammates especially appreciate spending time around.“I’m a people person, so it’s really easy for me,” Heggerston said. “People have told me they feel really comfortable around me. … I genuinely enjoy every single one of the players on our team, so it’s really easy to make people feel included and have a good time.”Senior leaders are something the women’s team haven’t had much of in recent years. When Heggerston was a freshman, the roster didn’t have any seniors. The team only had one each of the last two seasons. In her final year of eligibility, Heggerston feels she can provide important perspectives the team didn’t have when she was an underclassmen.“My freshman and sophomore year, we were pretty young,” Heggerston said. “We all just stuck together and had to be our own leaders. Throughout the years, I’ve learned a lot from [head] coach [Michele] Redman and just [from] being a student-athlete.”Many coaches, regardless of sport, insist the best programs are player-led. Redman said she’s been pleasantly surprised this season with how her players have held one another accountable, and every member of the squad exhibits leadership qualities in their own unique way.“It’s been interesting with our team this year,” Redman said. “I think they’ve been leading from within, all of them, which is really unusual, but it’s the way to go.”For Minnesota, it has become especially important that the players take charge and push one another, as they get closer to their upcoming tournament in Nevada on Oct. 22. Heggerston considers herself fortunate to have teammates who are willing and able to take on significant leadership roles on the team. One such teammate is fellow senior Muyu Wu, who Heggerston has played with for all four seasons at Minnesota.“[Wu] and I are so close; she’s one of my best friends,” Heggerston said. “We’re from different sides of the world, but we’ve been each other’s family. I’ve been super lucky to have her in the same class.”After golfing in exactly six tournaments for the Gophers each of her first three seasons, Heggerston has competed in just one so far this fall, the Minnesota Invitational in Woodbury.Despite not competing since, coach Redman complimented Heggerston on dedicating herself to the team and making sure her teammates know what is expected of them.“Because she’s been here so long, she knows what we expect as coaches,” Redman said. “I know she does a good job of communicating that. She just has that natural born leader quality to her. The girls really take a liking to her because she’s really good at making the players feel welcome.”Looking back on her time at Minnesota, Heggerston credits the golf team with helping her grow as a person. The Pequot Lakes native says it has been a special experience getting to represent her home state at the collegiate level.With just one tournament left before the end of her final fall season, Heggerston said she can’t believe her college career is nearly over. Still, she says there’s more to accomplish in her final spring with the program.“I have remind myself to enjoy every day and every experience,” Heggerston said. “I would absolutely love to go to one more Big Ten tournament and see our team go to Regionals.”last_img read more

Read More

Second ‘Ducks on the Tuck’ raffle is May 11

first_imgFor so many local students and their families, the annual “Ducks on the Tuck” race has provided a fun, interactive way to raise money for the New Century Scholars program.For the second year in a row, the event is going to be held virtually this spring. All proceeds from the fundraiser go toward the New Century Scholars program to help students in Jackson, Macon and Swain Counties attain their education.The duck draw raffle is Friday, May 11. Each ticket costs $5, or “Quack Packs” of six tickets sell for $25. Tickets are available from all New Century Scholars, program coordinators and the SCC Foundation.More than 30 prizes will be available this year, including the grand prize of a 49-inch LED Insignia flat-screen television donated by Custom Sound and Security of Franklin.In the weeks leading up to the event, each county’s progress will be updated at www.southwesterncc.edu/ducksonthetuck. The school superintendent for the county raising the most money by May 11 will be awarded the “Ducks on the Tuck” trophy.Jackson County narrowly edged out Macon last year.“Ducks on the Tuck is fun, but students benefiting from all the fun is the best part of it all,” said Dr. Don Tomas, president of SCC. “This program has been supporting students for more than two decades, and this fundraiser is essential to the future of New Century Scholars. We’re hoping the people of Jackson, Macon and Swain Counties will continue to support these students and their families.”Established in 1995 by Dr. Charles McConnell, former Jackson County superintendent, and then-SCC president Dr. Barry Russell, New Century Scholars provides last-dollar tuition assistance and extra support such as dedicated advising to deserving area students.New Century Scholars has served more than 2,200 students over the years. At present, 286 students participate in grades 7-12, and 167 attend SCC.Funding is provided through private donations, fundraisers and NCS endowments.For more info or to purchase tickets, contact Kathy Posey at 828.339.4227 or [email protected]last_img read more

Read More

Spencer volleyball finishes 2-2 at Altoona Invitational

first_imgRockets play in Cloverbelt crossover first-place match Thursday at AltoonaBy Paul LeckerSports ReporterALTOONA — Spencer won its first two matches but lost its final two at the Altoona Volleyball Invitational on Saturday at Altoona High School.The Rockets defeated Eau Claire North 18-25, 25-21, 15-9 and Cameron 25-13, 25-18 before losing to Hudson 25-23, 25-20 and Osceola 23-25, 26-24, 15-13.Macie Weber had 42 kills, 11 blocks, and nine aces; Sadie Mercier had 38 assists; and Jenna Rogers had 40 digs for the Rockets.Sydney Kind added 16 kills, five blocks, and five aces; Liz Endreas had 15 kills; Courtney Buss chipped in with 28 digs; and McKenzie Bainer had 30 assists in Spencer’s four matches.“It was great competition all day. We just ran out of steam in the afternoon,” Spencer coach Buff Heller said. “Hopefully it helps us build and improve going into the playoffs.”Spencer heads back to Altoona to play in the Cloverbelt Conference crossover first-place match at 7 p.m. Thursday.(Hub City Times Sports Reporter Paul Lecker is also the publisher of MarshfieldAreaSports.com.)last_img read more

Read More

Jenks Tight End Reese Leitao Names OSU in top 4

first_imgIf you’re looking for the comments section, it has moved to our forum, The Chamber. You can go there to comment and holler about these articles, specifically in these threads. You can register for a free account right here and will need one to comment.If you’re wondering why we decided to do this, we wrote about that here. Thank you and cheers! Jenks tight end prospect Reese Leitao, a 2017 prospect who was offered by OSU in January, has named his top schools and narrowed it down to four: Nebraska, Maryland, Penn State, and Oklahoma State.https://twitter.com/leitao_reese/status/763127986023378945The Cowboys already have one pledge at tight end in the 2017 class with Spencer Misko, and Leitao could be another big addition to the class who has the talent and ability to spread out wide as receiver, too. With both Blake Jarwin and Zac Veatch just one season away from using up their eligibility, a prospect of Leila’s caliber would be huge in smoothing out a transition as the Pokes look to utilize the cowboy back in the offense and specifically in the passing game. All 6-foot-4 of Leitao would be a difficult target to miss running across the field for Keondre Wudtee in 2018.last_img read more

Read More