Tag: 上海后花园ZU

Tennessee tornadoes latest: 5 kids among the dead in hard-hit Putnam County

first_imgThis is the damage around Catalpa Drive & Fescue Drive in Mt. Juliet. The area has been absolutely decimated. The cleanup has begun, but it’s going to be an incredibly long process. I’ll have more at 11 on @wkrn #NashvilleTornado #Nashville #MtJuliet #NashvilleStrong pic.twitter.com/SxKhPLoWQb— Kristina Shalhoup (@kshalhoupwx) March 4, 2020Nashville resident James Duncan said sirens started in the middle of the night before “howling” winds moved in.“Things started hitting the window, and my girlfriend and I shot out of bed and darted for the bathroom. We could hear objects slamming against the building … it was terrifying,” Duncan told ABC News. “They say tornadoes sound like a train … they were not lying. The feeling in my head from the pressure was insane. I’ve never felt anything like it.”Evan Winsor told ABC News he saw lightning hit the telephone pole in his Nashville backyard, knocking out the power. The wind picked up and it started to rain and hail, so he rushed to the basement to take cover.Winsor said his neighbors were “in disbelief” as they surveyed the toppled telephone poles and rubble in the street.One neighborhood “totally wiped out” was Five Points, an “iconic cultural hub in Nashville — especially with the local music and food scene,” Winsor said.The Basement East live music venue was completely destroyed. MattGush/iStock(NASHVILLE, Tenn.) — 22 missing, 5 kids among the dead in hard-hit Putman CountyAfter several deadly tornadoes tore through Tennessee — including Nashville — killing at least two dozen people, officials say 22 remain unaccounted for.After several powerful tornadoes tore through Tennessee, killing at least two dozen people, officials say three people remain unaccounted for in hard-hit Putnam County.Of the 25 killed by the twisters, 18 were Putnam County residents, Putnam County Mayor Randy Porter said Wednesday.Five children under the age of 13 died in Putnam County, Porter said.The tornadoes touched down Tuesday in the hours after midnight, ripping through Nashville and other cities in Tennessee. The twisters wiped out dozens of homes and businesses, including churches and schools.Some of those killed were asleep in their beds, officials said.Wilson County Mayor Randall Hutto told ABC News that a person in the town of Lebanon, who had been found in a damaged facility, died on Wednesday to become the 25th victim of the storm.“It hit so fast, a lot of folks didn’t have time to take shelter,” Porter said. “Many of these folks were sleeping.” Here are a few screenshots from the video. pic.twitter.com/9sueFP2Ymp— Vanderbilt Safety (@VUSafety) March 4, 2020One apartment complex was “totally demolished,” Porter said.Annakate Ross told ABC News she sheltered with her family in a closet in their Nashville home.Once the twister moved through, she opened the closet door to find that “the windows were blown out, the doors had been blown open and our neighbor had been ejected from his back house apartment into our yard.”“He survived,” Ross said. “He’s doing great.”center_img A tough morning across the state of #Tennesse — we’re live from #Nashville @GMA pic.twitter.com/ttBUMRlEQL— Rob Marciano (@RobMarciano) March 4, 2020The twisters left planes decimated at the John C. Tune Airport in West Nashville. No one there was injured and crews from Nashville International Airport will help rebuild, said Doug Kreulen, Nashville International Airport president and CEO.Decosta Jenkins, CEO of Nashville Electric Service, called this the “most devastating storm of my career.”About 600 utility poles were broken, Jenkins said. As of Wednesday afternoon about 34,800 customers remained without power.Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee has declared a state of emergency as a result of the devastation. President Donald Trump said he plans to visit Tennessee on Friday.The National Guard has been deployed to help with search-and-rescue efforts.Putnam County Sheriff Eddie Farris said Wednesday that crews still have to comb though about 40% of the rubble.Despite the destruction, Winsor said the community is pulling together to help each other.Nashville Mayor John Cooper said the website for Nashville volunteer organization Hands On Nashville crashed three times Tuesday from so many people trying to sign up to volunteer.Cooper said Google pledged $100,000 and that Amazon is donating supplies to community centers.Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Read More

California to fund first public research center on gun violence in the

first_img Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Epidemiologist Garen Wintemute, who studies firearm violence at UC Davis, says it is “coincidental” that the state legislature vote occurred so soon after the massacre in Orlando. The center grew out of conversations he had last fall with Wolk, he explained, and the timetable for approving a state budget—not the deadly shootings—determined when the vote took place. Still, he says the new research center provides “a very stark example” for Congress, which has balked at President Barack Obama’s repeated requests for a $10-million investment into gun violence research.In 2013 Obama directed the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and other federal agencies to study the causes and prevention of gun violence. That work had ground to a halt in 1996 after Congress banned the agency from any activity that would “advocate or promote gun control” and took away a tiny pot of money devoted to research on firearms. Former Representative Jay Dickey (R–AR), who championed the 1996 amendment, has publicly reversed his position and now lobbies for more research on gun violence.Historically, funding for gun-related research has been so difficult to obtain that Wintemute has spent more than $1 million of his own funds to sustain his research. A budget of $1 million per year for 5 years precludes a large-scale study or extensive data collection, he says. But it could pay for a handful of researchers to examine California’s unique data set on statewide gun transfers and other firearm-related activities, he says. While the location of the new center is not “locked in” yet, Wintemute believes UC Davis is the most likely candidate.One pressing question that even a small team could address is why California’s annual death rate from gun violence has dropped by roughly 20% since 2000 while the nationwide rate has not changed. “We don’t know why that is,” Wintemute says. “Are we doing something right? Or are we not doing something wrong that other [states] are?”He hopes the $5 million will attract additional private and public funding and spur other states to take action. In the meantime, he says, this week’s vote means “California can say, well, we’re doing it.” Four days after a mass shooting at a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida, left 49 people dead and 53 injured, California’s state legislature voted yesterday to establish a $5-million firearm violence research center within the University of California (UC)—the first such publicly charted center in the country.“Acts of firearm violence like Sunday’s horrific mass shooting in Orlando leave us searching for answers. California made finding those answers a priority, taking leadership once again where Congress has failed,” said state Democratic Senator Lois Wolk, who had proposed separate legislation earlier this year that was folded into a $170-billion budget bill approved this week by the legislature.The vote follows Wednesday’s 15-hour filibuster in the U.S. Senate, in which Democrats demanded tighter regulations on gun purchases. That move has set the stage for votes Monday on four gun-related amendments to a spending bill that funds the Justice Department and several other federal agencies, including the National Science Foundation and NASA. The deep partisan split over the gun measures could doom the bill, say some observers, and raise new obstacles to congressional approval of any 2017 spending bills.center_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more

Read More

Girls who share a womb with boys tend to make less money

first_img Email Female twins who shared a womb with a brother tend to get less education, earn less money, and have fewer children than girls who shared a womb with another girl, according to an analysis of hundreds of thousands of births over more than a decade. Researchers suspect the cause is testosterone exposure during fetal development, though the exact mechanism remains a mystery.“I think it’s a really interesting look at how this really complicated system might impact females,” says Talia Melber, a biological anthropologist at the University of Illinois in Urbana who wasn’t involved in the study. Still, she cautions, a lot more work needs to be done to establish a causal link.Fraternal twins, in which each of two eggs is fertilized by a different sperm cell, occur in about four of every 1000 births. About half of those result in male-female twin pairs. Typically, about 8 to 9 weeks into gestation, a male fetus begins to produce massive amounts of testosterone, which helps jump-start the development of male reproductive organs and brain architecture; female fetuses receive only modest amounts of the sex hormone. In male-female twins, though, small amounts of the male fetus’s testosterone can seep into the female twin’s separate amniotic sac. Scientists have known about this phenomenon for decades, and have been arguing for just as long over what effects, if any, it has on women later in life. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) By Michael PriceMar. 18, 2019 , 3:00 PM Oh Baby Productions/Alamy Stock Photo Girls who share a womb with boys tend to make less money than those with twin sisters Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe In the new study, behavioral economist Krzysztof Karbownik at Emory University in Atlanta, biological anthropologist Christopher Kuzawa at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, and colleagues turned to birth data from Norway. They looked at nearly 730,000 births between 1967 and 1978, including 13,800 twins.Controlling for factors such as birth weight and maternal education, women who had a male twin were 15.2% less likely to graduate from high school, 3.9% less likely to finish college, and 11.7% less likely to be married—compared with women with a twin sister. They also had 5.8% fewer children and earned 8.6% less money, the team reports today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.The team also looked at the outcomes for women whose male twin had died either during childbirth or very shortly after. The thinking goes that these women would have been exposed to testosterone in utero, but otherwise raised as a nontwin. The 583 women who met that criterion had virtually the same life outcomes as the women with living male twins, suggesting it’s the prenatal testosterone causing these long-lasting effects, not just the circumstance of being raised with a male twin.The study doesn’t explain why testosterone would have any of these effects. Previous work has found that, compared with female nontwins, female twins who shared a womb with brothers tend to develop more masculine bone structure and brains that appear more like average male brains, including having a larger left hippocampus and amygdala. These regions are involved in memory and emotional processing, respectively. Based on findings from prior research, all of this may cause women to act more aggressively, engage in more risk taking, and act in other ways that are traditionally seen as “male typical,” the authors speculate.Karbownik further speculates that all of this might lead to lower socioeconomic success for these women; an assertive, rule-breaking woman might be ostracized for breaking with traditional gender norms. “If you think these kinds of behaviors may be penalized by society, then that would be part of the effect we’re measuring.” As society’s views on gender norms have shifted in many places in recent decades, he’d like to repeat the study with data on younger twins.“For so long, we kind of ignored” testosterone in women and girls, Melber says. “We’re really behind the curve in terms of understanding … its long-term effects, and how it creates variation in how we behave and who we are as people.” Still, she says, the idea that prenatal testosterone exposure can cause specific life outcomes for women is premature. “You don’t want to take it to its extreme and say that there’s a foregone conclusion because there’s not.” Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more

Read More